Spa Speakers

The complete guide to meeting roles at Spa Speakers


At every Toastmasters club, you’ll see the same basic structure and set of meeting roles; however, each club adds their own twist to how they’re performed; as a result the instructions offered elsewhere on the web often do not accurately reflect the way roles are done at Spa. To address this, we’ve written this, our very own guide, so all our members have clear, unambigous instructions on how the roles are performed here. Read on!

We’ve divided each role description into 4 sections:

1. Introduction to role
2. Educational Value of role
3. Basic Instructions
4. Detailed Instructions

This guide is just the beginning, as every role is a vehicle for testing your leadership, speaking and listening skills to the limits of your potential.

Keep challenging yourself each time you are assigned a role. Don’t coast: find ways to grow and develop through your assignment.

Action required for first time role holders: After reviewing your role description, get in touch with your mentor for guidance and assistance before the meeting

Action required for more experienced members: After reviewing your role description, get in touch with your mentor before the meeting to help you identify opportunities to challenge yourself whilst fulfilling your role

Click buttons to get to relevant section.

Hospitality Roles

  • Cafeteria
  • Meet and Greet
  • Photographer of the evening

Segment Leadership Roles

  • Sergeant at Arms
  • Timekeeper
  • Warm-up Leader
  • Topics Master
  • Toastmaster of the Evening

Evaluation Roles

  • Grammarian and Ah Counter
  • Speech Evaluator
  • Topics Evaluator
  • General Evaluator

Hospitality Roles

Cafeteria

IntroductionEducational ValueBasic InstructionsDetailed Instuctions
The Cafeteria role holder mans the canteen before the meeting and during recess.

It’s a deceptively important role: offering refreshments and drinks helps nurture the great, hospitable and friendly culture that is the hallmark of Spa Speakers.

By doing this role, you automatically gets to meet many members, so it’s a great way to get acquainted with everyone if you are new.

The role doesn’t contribute to the Competent Leader educational award

Key skills: Facilitation, Rapport, Listening

Why do it? Manning the cafeteria puts you in the fray of your fellow members and guests, so it’s a great opportuntity to develop interpersonal communication skills. Also, getting the drinks right demands good listening skills!

  • Arrive early (7.00pm) to serve before the meeting starts
  • Work with the Sergeant-at-Arms to make sure you have all the catering supplies
  • Be warm, friendly and make a great cuppa
  • Man the cafeteria during recess
  • Arrive 7.00pm
  • Make sure you have:
    • mugs
    • sugar
    • spoons
    • soya and dairy milk
    • caff and decaff coffee
    • caff and decaff tea
    • biscuits, plates
    • mugs
    • napkins

— and lay them out (work with the Sergeant at Arms)

  • Get help (two people makes the job a lot easier)
  • Don’t be afraid to call out from behind the canteen to let people know you are serving
  • Answer any questions from guests
  • Introduce any guests you serve to another member so they have someone to talk to

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Meet and Greet

IntroductionEducational ValueBasic InstructionsDetailed Instructions

The Meet and Greet role holder offers a warm welcome to every member and guest that comes to our meetings. You’ll welcome guests at the door, make sure they are attended to during recess, and give them a warm farewell at the end of the meeting.

The importance of this role cannot be overestimated: it helps a potentially nervous guest feel right at home from the moment they arrive.

This is a great role for new members: it gives them a chance to automatically meet the entire club!

The role contributes to achieving the Competent Leader educational award

Competent Leader Project 7: Facilitation – Befriend a Guest (applicable only on guest nights)

Key skills: Facilitation, Listening, Rapport

Before the meeting starts

  • Arrive 7.00pm (ring the bell to be let in if no one is there to greet you at the door)
  • Collect your kit from the Sergeant at Arms, then station yourself at the reception doors
  • Warmly welcome each guest and member that comes through, offering a sticky name-badge, jotting down their name of a piece of paper and asking them to fill in the book at the front desk
  • Give guests an introductory flyer
  • Direct guests to the meeting room, either by accompanying them personally, or pairing them with any members who have arrived recently
  • Remain at your post until 7.29pm before heading to the meeting hall
  • Give the list of guests you have compiled to the president
  • Attend to late arrivers: after the meeting has commenced at 7:30pm, be on alert for the reception buzzer going. When it happens go fetch the guest or member until 7:40pm

During Recess

  • Meet all the guests and make sure they are being made welcome!

After the meeting

  • Stand at the exit and give a fond farewell to all guests and members as they leave

Before the meeting

You should have received a list of expected guests from the Vice President of Membership. If not, get in touch with him by emailing here. Please familiarise yourself with their names. Warning! This list might not have every guest’s name as we can get unexpected visitors.

Bring your Competent Leadership manual!

On arrival

  • Arrive 7.00pm (On arrival you might need to ring the bell to be let in. The bell is located on the table between both sets of doors at the front of the Helen Ley Care Centre)
  • Give your manual to a fellow member (not a guest) to evaluate how you performed the role during the meeting. The best person to evaluate you will be your fellow Meet and Greeter!
  • Check if any guests have already arrived and jot their names down on a piece of paper
  • Collect your kit: pick up marker pens, white sticky labels, some paper and the guest flyers from the Sergeant at Arms and arrange them on the table in reception next to the sliding doors
  • When guests and members arrive:
    • warmly welcome each, writing down their names on a piece of paper (this is so guests can be introduced by the president at the start of the meeting)
    • Jot down the guest’s name on a sticky label and ask them to wear it somewhere visible: it will be their name badge for the evening
    • Give any guests a copy of the guest flyer to keep
    • Where possible, pair any arriving guests with an existing member currently in reception and so they can be accompanied to the meeting room
  • If no existing member is around when a guest arrives, either accompany them yourself if you have 2 meet and greets, or keep speaking to them until a member arrives so they can lead them to the meeting hall
  • Remain at your post until 7.29pm before heading to the meeting hall: it is crucial the meeting starts on time
  • Important: give the list of guests you have compiled to the president!
  • Attend to late arrivers: when you arrive to the meeting hall, be on alert  for the reception buzzer going. When it happens go fetch the guest or member until 7:40pm

During Recess

  • Check up on the guests to see how they are finding the evening and make sure they are being made to feel welcome (talk to them, introduce them to other members, accompany them to the cafeteria)

After the meeting

  • Stand at the exit so you can give a fond farewell to all guests and members as they leave
  • Invite guests to return for a second visit if they were undecided so they can make up their mind
  • Collect any feedback slips they might of completed and give to a committee member

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Photographer of the evening

IntroductionEducational ValueBasic InstructionsDetailed Instuctions
The photographer of the evening is tasked with taking photos of the evening’s proceedings.

The pictures taken will be posted on social media to help promote the club, and shared via our club newsletter to keep our members apprised of all the great stuff happening at our meetings!

The role doesn’t contribute to the Competent Leader educational award by itself, but if done in combination with preparing the club newsletter, or if you are involved with organising a PR campaign for the club, being photographer will form an essential part of your duties.

Get in touch with the committee if you want to perform this role as part of one the following projects

Competent Leader Projects
Project 6:
Organisation and Delegation
– Help organise a PR campaign
– Help produce a club newsletter

Project 8: Motivation
– PR campaign chair

Project 10: Team Building
– PR campaign chair
– Newsletter editor

However, if you choose to do it outside of taking on a leadership project, you’ll find it’s a really fun role!

  • Take lots of good quality photos of the evening’s events that reflect the fun, friendly and supportive atmosphere of the club!
  • Send the photos to the Vice President of Public Relations so they can be posted on social media promptly
  • Bring a digital camera or a smartphone with a high quality camera
  • Make sure you clear enough memory to take at least 10 – 15 pictures
  • Take a few test shots at the venue to see what gets the best result in the light
  • Take photos of:
    • the evening awards given by president at end of the meeting
    • any special call-outs (e.g. new members, leaving members, costumes, group photos)
    • the evening’s proceedings (during recess, during the meeting)
    • Any other notable event / special requests by the committee / president
  • Find a good location to sit so you can easily approach the lectern when awards are being presented
  • If possible, avoid using a flash
  • Don’t be afraid to move around to get a good angle!
  • Try to be discrete – the ideal is the photographer doesn’t disrupt the evenings proceedings
  • Email the photos to the Vice Presidet of Public Relations at vppr.spa@gmail.com at the end of the meeting so they can be posted in a timely fashion on social media
  • Preferable to email, please use the free file sharing service, wetransfer.com, to send the photos

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Segment Leadership Roles

Sergeant at Arms

IntroductionEducational ValueBasic InstructionsDetailed Instructions

The Sergeant at Arms helps set up the room, opens the meeting on schedule, gives safety instructions, and open second half of meeting.

Starting the meeting on time is crucial, so an effective Sergeant at Arms is a very important role

The role does not contribute to the Competent Leadership Award

Key skills: Assertiveness, Time Management, Facilitation

The role not only requires considerable organisational skills, but also demands that the holder be very loud and assertive so we start right on time!

Before the meeting

  • Arrive 6.45pm or earlier
  • Give the meet and greeters their kit
  • Set up the room
  • Make sure the meeting starts at 7:30pm on the dot
  • Make your opening introduction (make it short and sweet, and cover all the essential points)

During the Meeting

  • When instructed by the Toastmaster of the evening, collect the votes for the awards, and give these to the members at the Timekeepers table
  • Reopen the meeting after the break as per time designated by the Toastmaster of the evening LOUDLY!

After the meeting

  • Help put everything away, making sure items are returned to the correct storage box
  • Work with the committee Sergeant at Arms to make sure stock taking can be undertaken before boxes are returned
  • Arrive 6.45pm or earlier
  • Engage with the attendant committee member before getting started

There is quite a bit to do, so seek assistance as you perform your role. There will be at least one other committee member in attendance at 6:45.

Everything you need is in the main meeting room, except for the banner and plastic storage boxes

Heavy lifting bit!

  • Move the lectern to the front of the room
  • set up the Toastmasters banner (ask for help!)
  • Move one large wooden table to the centre of the room for use of the Timekeeper (make sure it’s within a short distance of the electrical sockets)
  • Move 2 large wooden tables towards the back of the room, for visitors material
  • Put out chairs (leave sufficient space between chairs for easy movement and good visibility for those sitting in the row behind) – the committee will estimate the numbers required
  • Move the flipchart towards the back of the room by the entrance
  • There are 5 large plastic storage boxes and 1 small plastic storage box that contain very specific items. Move these boxes to the following locations:
    1. Clipboards Box – move to the side of the main meeting room, out of everyone’s way
    2. Timekeeper and Lectern box – place underneath the Timekeepers table
    3. Visitors information box – place underneath table set up for visitors information near the entrance
    4. Catering box – place on the worktop at the cafeteria area
    5. Vice President of Education Box – no action required
    6. Audio Visual Box – required when a member wishes to use the TV and give a laptop presentation

The Committee Sergeant at Arms will ensure these boxes are fully stocked up. If anything is missing and you notice, let him/her know

Tasks

Assist Meet and Greeters

  • Give marker pens, name badge stickers and guest flyers to the meet and greeters at reception.
  • Set up the folding display board on the table at reception
  • Items found in the visitors information box

Assist Cafeteria

  • Help lay out spoons, milk, mugs, napkins, biscuits, drinks if necessary. Items found in the catering box (there will be a dedicated person for the Cafeteria, so give help as necessary)

Set up Timekeepers Table

  • Set out the Timekeepers table. All items found in the Timekeeper and lectern plastic storage box.
  • Items for for table:
    • Traffic lights
    • Bell
    • Stopwatch
    • Certificates for Best Evaluator, Speaker and Tabletopics
    • 2 pens and paper
    • Detailed agenda
    • Formal Address card
    • Evaluation slips
    • Blu-tack
    • The 3 coloured sheets (back-up in case the lights do not work)

Set up lectern 

  • Set up lectern. All items found in the Timekeeper and lectern plastic storage box
    • Gavel
    • Formal Address card
    • Blu-tack

Set out Members Chairs

Put the following items on each chair. All items except meeting agenda found in the Clipboards box

  • 1 clipboard with 1 pen in the clipboard’s pen holster
  • Lay out evaluation slips – one slip per chair
  • 2 Post-it notes
  • 1 copy of the agenda (the Toastmaster of the evening will bring copies)

Support members giving presentation

In the small ikea Audio Visual Box are a 2 HDMI cables, a VGA to VGA cable, and a presentation clicker. If a member intends to give a computer presentation:

  • find the box (stored in the Visitors information box), give it to the member
  • Please make sure all the cables and the clicker are returned to the box. Do not leave them plugged into the TV as that means we won’t get them back

Starting the meeting

  • At 7:28pm, check the Toastmaster and President are ready to begin meeting
  • Start calling people to their seats before 7.30pm so we have a sharp 7:30pm start
  • BE LOUD! USE THE GAVEL! Confidently tell members “meeting is starting, take your seats”
  • In your introduction:
    • use the following address -“Mr President, Fellow Toastmasters and Welcome Guests”
    • Ask us to silence our mobile phones
    • Point out where the toilets are
    • Warn us that if there’s a fire alarm we should go back along the corridor and out through the front doors
    • Introduce the current President, shake his hand and hand over the meeting to him

During the Meeting

  • Sometimes the door opens during the meeting and can disturb meeting proceedings: if this should happen close/lock them (ask a committee member to show you how)
  • When instructed by the Toastmaster of the evening, collect the votes for the awards, and give these to the members at the Timekeepers table
  • Reopen the meeting after the break as per time designated by the Toastmaster of the evening. BE LOUD! Start banging the gavel a minute or 2 before the designated start time

After the meeting

  • Help put everything away, making sure items are returned to the correct plastic storage box
  • In particular, please double check to see the cables and clicker are returned to the small Ikea plastic storage box
  • In particular, please make sure all teaspoons belonging the club are returned to the club box and not left in the sink

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Timekeeper Role

IntroductionEducational ValueBasic InstructionsDetailed Instructions

The Timekeeper records the time each speaker takes, and signals to speakers how much time they have left using a traffic light system to help them finish on time. Making sure no one “steals time” from anyone else is a key part of the role.

The traffic lights work as they do on the road: green means “go”, amber means “start to think about stopping” and red means “stop”.

The club relies on the Timekeeper to ensure our meeting as a whole end on time, and that we can all afford to take a 10 minute break.

Click button below to download a handy template to help you do your role. Be sure to hand the report to the president at the end of the meeting!

The role contributes to achieving the Competent Leader educational award

Competent Leader Project 4: Time Management

Key skills: Assertiveness, Time Management

Before the Meeting

  • Arrive early (7.15pm at the latest)
  • Make sure you have all your timing equipment as well as pen and paper
  • Make sure you have a copy of the detailed agenda: this has all the timings for the evening’s speakers

During the Meeting 

  • When asked by the Toastmaster, come to the lectern and give a short opening presentation (between 1-2 minutes) about the role you will be performing
  • Point out that you’re going to be timing all the role holders (e.g. grammarian explanation, warmup explanation, Tabletopics explanation) so they know they need to be succinct!
  • During the warm up, ring the bell when someone speaks for more than 10 seconds
  • For all other speakers and role holders, use the timing lights to signal timings to the speaker as per the agenda
  • When signalling, leave each coloured light on until its time to change to the next colour
  • Use the bell if the speaker exceeds their maximum designated time by 30 seconds
  • When asked, go the the lectern to report on: prepared speech times, TableTopic speech times and evaluation times

Before the Meeting

  • Bring your Competent Leader manual and give it to a fellow member so they can evaluate you, and thus contribute towards your award. There should be an experienced member with you to support you through the role. If not, ask!
  • Arrive early (7.15pm at the latest) so you can get organised
  • Make sure you have:
    • A stopwatch
    • Timing lights
    • Bell
    • 3 coloured sheets of paper (back-up in case the lights do not work)
    • A working pen, and paper to record times
    • A copy of the detailed agenda: this has all the timings for the evening’s speakers
    • Copies of evening award certificates (you’ll support the process of counting votes)

These items can all be found in the Timekeeper and Lectern plastic storage box. Work with the Sergeant at Arms

During the Meeting

  • When asked by the Toastmaster, come to the lectern and give a short opening presentation about the role you will be performing. This should be no more than 1-2 minutes
  • Point out that you’re going to be timing all the role holders (e.g. grammarian explanation, warm up explanation, Tabletopics explanation) so they know they need to be succinct!
  • During the warm up, ring the bell when someone speaks for more than 10 seconds. Talk to the Warm up lead as required
  • For all other speakers, use the timing lights to signal timings to the speaker as per the agenda
  • When signalling, leave each coloured light on until its time to change to the next colour
  • Use the bell if the speaker exceeds their maximum designated time by 30 seconds
  • When asked, go the the lectern to report on: prepared speech times, Tabletopic speech times and evaluation times
  • When reporting on times, especially for Tabletopics, remind the audience of the question and then something about the answer: your report will be used to help members vote for the best speaker, evaluator and Tabletopics

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Warm-up Leader

IntroductionEducational ValueBasic InstructionsDetailed Instructions

The warm up leader’s job is to warm up our vocal cords and raise the energy levels at the meeting by posing a simple question for each person in the room to answer.

The role does not contribute to the Competent Leadership Award

The role challenges the role holder to get on stage, and lead a segment of the evening whose purpose is to raise the energy levels in a room. That’s a good learning experience and a valuable leadership skill!

Key skills: Assertiveness, Time Management, Facilitation

Before the meeting

  • Thinks of a simple question which can be answered in a few words to pose to members and guests

During the meeting

  • When invited by the Toastmaster, get on stage, briefly introduce yourself, the purpose of the role, the question, the running order and the first speaker
  • After everyone has answered your question, say a few closing remarks and hand back to the Toastmaster of the evening

During the meeting

  • Give a short introduction to the role
  • As warm up lead, you’ll pose a simple question and ask everyone in the room to give you an answer of no more than 8 words
  • Explain that a bell will ring if they spend more than 10 seconds on their answer
  • Please make it clear that guests don’t need to join in if they don’t feel like it
  • Ask people not to clap, so we can move swiftly around the room
  • Indicate who will start and the direction after that. Pick an experienced member to give a the first answer: their answer often sets the precedent as to how long everyone’s answers are
  • Generally only ten minutes is allocated for this part of the evening, so it needs to be fast and fun!

For members-only meetings

  • To increase the challenge levels for more experienced members, consider offering two options: a simple question for newer members, and a more challenging question or variation to the question for more experienced members to tackle!

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Table Topics Master

IntroductionEducational ValueBasic InstructionsDetailed Instructions

The Table Topics Master leads what we call Table Topics, a segment of the meeting where members practice thinking on their feet by delivering unprepared mini-speeches in response to a selection of questions.

The role contributes to achieving the Competent Leader educational award

Competent Leader Projects
Project 4:
 Time Management
Project 5: 
Planning and Implementation
Project 7: 
Facilitation

Key skills: Planning, Facilitation, Time Management

Before the meeting

  • Thinks of a series of open-ended question to be answered by members (and potentially guests if sufficient time is available and all members have spoken in some capacity during the evening) which will likely inspire an answer that is at least one minute long.
  • Prepare a sufficient number of questions for the segment. Confirm with the Toastmaster of the evening or the Vice President of Education how much time the segment will last to guide you.
  • Bring your education manual and hand it to a fellow member so your role can be evaluated.

During the meeting

  • Confirm with the Toastmaster of the Evening the time allocated to the Table Topics segment. Adjust the number of questions you ask according to this information.
  • When invited by the Toastmaster, get on stage, briefly introduce yourself, the purpose of the role, the formal address, and your first question. Select an experienced member who has not had a role or speech during the evening as your first participant.
  • Invite your first participant to the stage, shake their hand and take a seat.
  • Once the participant has completed their answer, return to the stage, shake the participants hand, thank them for their answer, and ask the next question to select your next contestant.
  • Repeat process until all your questions have been completed OR the time allocated to the segment has expired.
  • As the segment progresses, communicate with the Toastmaster whether further questions should be asked based on meeting timings.
Before the meeting

  • Pick a theme for your questions. Use the theme on the agenda if stated.
  • Write open-ended questions that fit the theme. Write a maximum of 8 questions. E.g. “Do you like cricket?” is too narrow, but “Which sports do you like to watch and / or to play?” is wider and easier to answer
  • Draw up a list of possible speakers. This will be subject to change depending on who comes to the meeting. Pick those who are not doing roles to ensure as many different people get a chance to speak as possible at the meeting
  • Pick an experienced speaker to go first so they can set a precedent for other speakers
  • Make sure you bring your educational manual!

At the meeting

  • Briefly introduce TableTopics by covering these key points:
  • The purpose of TableTopics is to practice delivering impromptu speeches in a relaxed, friendly and non-judgemental environment. Being able to deliver well structured, cogent speeches without notice is a valuable skill at all manner of work and social occasions
  • Answers are to be between 1 – 2 minutes
  • A green light is shown at 1 minute, an amber at 1:30 minute, and a red light at 2 minutes. The bell will be sounded if the speaker exceeds his alotted time by more than 30 seconds.
  • Announce the topic question (repeat it so the speaker and audience understand it) and then call on the person you want to speak
  • In between the Topics, keep your comments short
  • Adjust the number of Topics to end your session on time

Bonus tips

Not sure how to announce a question? Try this format:

“Which sportsmen or women do you admire and why?” …. “Which sportsmen or women do you admire and why? “….”and that question is for Jane” …”please welcome Jane”

What about including guests?

If there is time, during recess or before the meeting begins, have a word with any guests to see if they would like to try TableTopics. Do not put them under pressure.

 

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Toastmaster of the Evening

IntroductionEducational ValueBasic InstructionsDetailed Instructions

The Toastmaster is the meeting’s director and host.  The role holder is tasked with acquiring a meeting agenda from the Vice President of Education and and ensuring the meeting runs according to the agenda in a fun, friendly and supportive way that is both efficient and timely.

At Spa Speakers, running a meeting that starts on time, ends on time, and affords us a 10 minute recess is very important: therefore a strong timekeeping discipline is requested of the Toastmaster of evening

It’s an advanced role and a member typically will not be assigned this role until they are thoroughly familiar with the club and its procedures. Make sure you consult with your mentor before taking on th role.

The role contributes to achieving the Competent Leader educational award

Competent Leader Projects
Project 4:
 Time Management
Project 5: 
Planning and Implementation
Project 7: 
Facilitation
Project 8: Motivation
Project 10: Team Building

Key skills: Planning, Facilitation, Time Management, public speaking

Members and guests will be asked to provide feedback to the Toasmaster using the evaluation and ballot slips. Make sure you collect them at the end of the meeting.

Before the meeting

  • Coordinate with the Vice President of Education to ensure all roles on the agenda are filled
  • Get in touch with role holders as appropriate to brief them in view of running a timely and efficient meeting

During the meeting

  • Arrive at 7:00pm to give time to get organised and meet role holders
  • Deal with any changes to the agenda (e.g. role holders not turning up, cancelled speech slots, contingency plans for expected late arrivers): work with the Vice President of Education
  • Ensure the meeting starts at 7:30pm
  • Ensure the meeting ends at the designated end time as indicated on the meeting agenda
  • Ensure a recess of a minimum length of 10 minutes is scheduled
  • Run the meeting according the the agenda in a smooth and efficient fashion
  • Steer us cheerfully and briskly through the various items on the agenda
  • Introduce, welcome, support the leadership role takers, letting each of them explain the purpose of their roles
  • Introduce speakers during the club meeting, including their:
    • speech topic
    • project title
    • objectives
    • delivery time

during your introduction.

  • Indicate at each point what is going to happen / why it is going to happen
  • Instruct and educate the audience about giving written feedback and voting
  • Let the participants be the stars of the show
Before the meeting

  • Get in touch with key role holders (speakers, Timekeeper, Sergeant at Arms, evaluators, Topics master, warm-up) to ensure they are coming in coordination with the Vice President of Education
  • In particular ask the warm-up leader and Tabletopics master to ensure their segments are kept to time as they have the greatest risk of overrun
  • Instuct the Sergeant at Arms to start the meeting 7:30pm sharp
  • Develop a contingency plan in case speakers and role holders are not able to make it, or are expected to be late

Maintaining a strong time keeping discipline

  • Maintain a strong timekeeping focus: start 7:30, end at the designated time on agenda.
  • Work with the Timekeeper to ensure every role is timed and warm-up answer is timed, not just speeches
  • Remain mindful of the schedule and make adjustments accordingly (e.g. speak to Topics master during recess about length of segment) to ensure we finish to time

Miscellaneous tips and guidance on leading the meeting

  • Don’t wait for all role holders and speakers to arrive before commencing the meeting – get started and work out a contingency: a meeting that starts late will end late!
  • Keep your opening remarks short, succinct
  • Keep the energy of the room high by encouraging clapping
  • Keep your comments between speakers succinct, purposeful and fun
  • Remind members of our protocols: use of the address, clapping and handshakes
  • See yourself as a background figure, not the star of the show (they would be the role holders!)
  • Remain silent when asking members to complete evaluation slips for speakers to avoid distracting them
  • Make sure you advise members to complete their feedback slips, not just for speakers, but for the Topics Master, General Evaluator and Toastmaster of the evening
  • Request that members provide feedback on the meeting as a whole by using the post-its provided and when leaving the room sticking them to the flipchart for the committee to respond to
  • Be alert to distractions and background activities that might be impeding the meeting: e.g. be sure to lock the automatic doors once the meeting commences
 


Evaluation Roles

Grammarian and Ah Counter

IntroductionEducational ValueBasic InstructionsDetailed Instructions

This is a role of several parts.

First up, as Ah Counter, you will be monitoring how often speakers use verbal crutches such as “um”, “ah”, “like” and reporting back your findings

Members requested a template to help them with ah-counter duties. Click here to download a copy and print off!

Second, as Grammarian, you will not only be jotting down any outstanding turns of phrase used by speakers, but also identifying any misuses of the English language so the speaker might improve for next time

As a special bonus, you will select a “Word of the Day”, which you will challenge all meeting participants to weave into their speaking during the evening

It’s a great role for sharpening your listening skills and encouraging others to embrace the power of language!

The role contributes to achieving the Competent Leader educational award

Competent Leader Projects
Project 1: Listening
Project 2: Critical Thinking
Project 3: Giving Feedback
Project 4: Time Management

Key skills: Listening, Time Management, Giving Feedback, Critical Feedback

  • Select a word of the day and display it so it is visible clearly to both audience and speakers
  • Give a short introduction on the role you will perform
  • Take notes throughout the evening on the use of verbal crutches, good and poor use of language, and how much the word of the day was used
  • Give a short report on what you observed

Members requested a template to help them with ah-counter duties. Click here to download a copy and print off!

Before the meeting

  • Select your Word of the Day before the meeting
  • In large bold letters, print onto two A4+ sized sheets
  • Bring your manual

On arrival

  • Arrive early enough that you have time to stick one sheet with blutack or tape on the timekeeper’s table to alert and the other on the front of the lectern to alert the speaker and audience respectively (ask the Sergeant at Arms where the blu-tack is!)
  • Give your manual to someone to evaluate

During the meeting

  • When asked, briefly explain the role (you’ll be timed so be succinct!)
  • When asked, report back on excellent use of language, misuses of grammar, use of the the word of the day, and on how often verbal crutches were used by speakers. Again you will be timed, so choose what you will report back to keep within your designated time.

Always be supportive, encouraging, friendly when reporting back. Be sensitive to newer members, and help more advanced speakers grow by highlighting opportunities to improve.

Top Tip: If you don’t quite say everything you wanted to, feel free to approach individual members after the meeting is over to convey any points you feel would encourage, support and help them improve.

Members requested a template to help them with ah-counter duties. Click here to download a copy and print off!

Need more help? Click here for further guidance on the role.

 

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Speech Evaluator

IntroductionEducational ValueBasic InstructionsDetailed Instructions

The Evaluator appraises a speech, giving useful commendations and recommendations. It is one of the most important skills you will learn at Spa Speakers.

The main purpose is to help the Speaker improve.

Secondary purposes are to help everyone else in the audience improve, and to further hone your own public speaking skills. Otherwise you might as well just have a private chat with the Speaker afterwards!

The role contributes to achieving the Competent Leader educational award

Competent Leader Projects
Project 1: Listening
Project 2: Critical Thinking
Project 3: Giving Feedback
Project 8: Motivation

Key skills: Listening, Critical Feedback, Giving Feedback, Motivation

Before the meeting

  • Speak to the speaker you are to evaluate to familiarise yourself with:
    • the speech objectives
    • the speakers objectives
    • the feedback critera
  • Take their educational manual so you can complete it
  • Give your educational manual to a fellow member so they can evaluate your performance as evaluator

During the Meeting

  • Listen carefully as your target speaker speaks and take notes
  • Deliver your evaluation in a friendly, supportive and encouraging way, offering both commendations and recommmendations.
  • Deliver your evaluation speech in 3.00 minutes, with a basic structure of commendations, then recommendations and finally a commendation and an encouraging summary statement

Here are some additional pointers, however this is in no way exhaustive. Giving a speech evaluation is an art and there are many ways to develop a great evaluation speech!

  • Keep your notes organised: have a plan as to how you want to record your observations
  • Write legibly!
  • Start with a strong opening statement to engage the audience
  • Use the speaker educational manual as a visual aid, and go through the objectives of the speech for the benefit of the audience
  • Use specific examples when giving commendations and recommendations rather than general statements
  • Speak to the entire audience, not just to the speaker: speak in the 3rd person to help you do that
  • Think about categories such as content, delivery, body language and gestures, vocal variety, structure, pace of speaking to help you look for valuable feedback
  • Always end with a commendation and on an encouraging note

Need more help? Click here and here for further guidance on the role. Read your Toastmasters magazine for a continuous stream of great suggestions!

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Topics Evaluator

IntroductionEducational ValueBasic InstructionsDetailed Instructions

The Table Topics Evaluator provided feedback to all of the Table Topics Speakers to help them become more confident and effective.

A Table Topic is shorter than a normal Prepared Speech, so a Table Topics Evaluation should be correspondingly briefer for each speaker than a Prepared Speech Evaluation. In other respects, the same guidelines for Evaluating a Prepared Speech apply.

The role contributes to achieving the Competent Leader educational award

Competent Leader Projects
Project 1: Listening
Project 2: Critical Thinking
Project 3: Giving Feedback
Project 8: Motivation

Key skills: Listening, Critical Thinking, Giving Feedback, Motivation

During the Meeting

  • Be brief, punchy and to the point with each topics evaluation
  • Listen carefully as your target speakers speaks and take notes
  • Deliver your evaluation in a friendly, supportive and encouraging way, offering both commendations and recommmendations.
  • Aim for a commendation, a recommendation, and one further commendation for each speaker

Here are some additional pointers, however this is in no way exhaustive. Giving a speech evaluation is an art and there are many ways to develop a great evaluation speech!

  • Keep your notes organised: have a plan as to how you want to record your observations
  • Write legibly!
  • Use specific examples when giving commendations and recommendations rather than general statements
  • Speak to the entire audience, not just to the speaker: speak in the 3rd person to help you do that
  • Think about categories such as content, delivery, body language and gestures, vocal variety, structure, pace of speaking to help you look for valuable feedback
  • Always end with a commendation and an encouraging note
  • The number of speakers each evening can vary but the time-slot is normally unchanged so the level of detail given to each speaker will need to be adjusted accordingly

Need more help? Click here and here for further guidance on the role. Read your Toastmasters magazine for a continuous stream of great suggestions!

 

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General Evaluator

IntroductionEducational ValueBasic InstructionsDetailed Instructions

The aim of the General Evaluator is to give feedback to the speech evaluators and to the evening’s Toastmaster. Feedback for other role holders, such as Grammarian and Timekeeper is not included, or is only mentioned in passing when there is some specific aspect that stands out. This is so the segment remains short but purposeful.

Generally we only allocate 4-6 minutes for this, so you’ll need to be fairly brief.

It’s a challenging role, requiring good listening, note taking and organisation to do well. It’s a role offered to members after they have gained ample experience doing earlier roles.

The role contributes to achieving the Competent Leader educational award

Competent Leader Projects
Project 2: Critical Thinking
Project 3: Giving Feedback
Project 5: Planning and Implementation
Project 7: Facilitation
Project 8: Motivation
Project 10: Team Building

Key skills: Listening, Critical Thinking, Giving Feedback, Planning and Implementation, Facilitation, Motivation, Team Building

Role holders wishing for feedback should refer to their mentor or their Competent Leader manual evaluator. Members and guests will be asked to provide feedback to the general evaluator using the evaluation and ballot slips. Make sure you collect those too.

Before the Meeting

  • Study the agenda
  • Confirm with the Toastmaster of the evening any last minute changes
  • Bring your educational manual and give it to an experienced member to evaluate you. This is a challenging role and requires a more experienced member’s input

During the Meeting

  • Be brief, punchy and to the point with each evaluation subject
  • Listen carefully as your target speakers speaks
  • Have a strategy on how you are going to take notes
  • Deliver your evaluation in a friendly, supportive and encouraging way, offering both commendations and recommmendations
  • General evaluations are normally done by very experienced Toastmasters and are asked to set a good example of both timekeeping and structure

Here are some additional pointers, however this is in no way exhaustive. The general evaluation is an art and there are many ways to develop a great evaluation speech!

  • Keep your notes organised: have a plan as to how you want to record your observations
  • Write legibly!
  • Use specific examples when giving commendations and recommendations rather than general statements
  • Speak to the entire audience, not just to the speaker: speak in the 3rd person to help you do that
  • Always end with a commendation and an encouraging note for each member evaluated
  • Do give constructive feedback: we learn through being shown where we can do better as well as through encouragement and praise

Need more help? Click here for further guidance on the role. Read your Toastmasters magazine for a continuous stream of great suggestions!